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What’s New at the Agnes

30 August 2017

Photo: Tim Forbes

Carina Magazzeni
Curatorial Assistant, Contemporary Art

Carina Magazzeni has been supporting contemporary programs by assisting with grant writing, research, development and coordination of an artist residency and exhibitions, ancillary programming and publications. A recent MA graduate from the Cultural Studies program at Queen’s University, Carina’s position is supported by the Young Canada Works at Building Careers in Heritage program.

Carina is an emerging curator, cultural worker and artist who has been interning, volunteering and working at the Agnes since arriving in Kingston in 2014. She was recently awarded the Queen’s University Marty Memorial Scholarship for independent curatorial research on Alternative Archives: Kingston’s Carceral Histories and Contemporary Realities, which will be activated at the Centre for Indigenous Research Creation this fall.

21 August 2017

Carl Beam, New World (#1, Columbus Suite), 1989. Purchase, Chancellor Richardson Memorial Fund, 1990 (33-013.01) Photo: Paul Litherland

Look for works by Carl Beam, Rebecca Belmore and Wally Dion featured in the Agnes Atrium. These powerful works from the Agnes collection variously address the natural environment, enduring spiritual values and the ravages of colonization.

14 August 2017

Photo: Tim Forbes

Caitlyn Picard
Textile Conservation Technician

Caitlyn Picard is working at the Agnes for the next year as the new Textile Conservation Technician. She is responsible for completing a full survey and risk and condition assessment of the Queen’s University Collection of Canadian Dress. Caitlyn will also digitize selected items for our online collections database, and rehouse objects, completing minor treatments as required. Her work will greatly enhance access to and research of our remarkable Collection of Canadian Dress, which numbers over 2500 objects, including dresses, shoes, fans, parasols, jackets, hats and much more.

Holding a graduate degree in Textile Conservation from the Centre for Textile Conservation at theUniversity of Glasgow, Scotland, Caitlyn is excited to apply her passion and skills for textile conservation at the Agnes.

The Textile Conservation Technician position is generously funded by Dr Isabel Bader. AgnesDirector Jan Allen points out, “We are thrilled to welcome Caitlyn to the Agnes! A full year of technical care and documentation will be of immense benefit to the collection, and her work will broaden research access to these rare holdings. I’m tremendously grateful to Isabel Bader for her sustained interest in and support for the care of  Queen’s Collection of Canadian Dress.”

Planning has begun for an exhibition drawn from this collection for presentation in 2019.

31 July 2017

Fire Road Bridge, over Vermilion River, Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, 1975. The Ian M. Collier Collection, Gift of Ian Collier, 2016 (59-017.59)

A flood of visitors have been arriving, and returning again with friends, to enjoy Road Trip: Across Canada with Alan C Collier. Curator Alicia Boutilier’s selection of paintings from the 2016 gift of the artist’s son Ian Collier is sparking fresh appreciation of Alan Collier’s artistic vision.

03 July 2017

Photo: Tim Forbes

Kyle Holleran
Visitor Services Assistant

Kyle Holleran joined us as Visitor Services Assistant a year ago. In this short time he has made a big difference, offering a warm welcome for visitors and handling a growing number of facility bookings. The Agnes is  a busy place, and Kyle Holleran, an ever gracious multi-tasker, ensures every visitor has a great experience.

Kyle is a Queen’s University alumnus (Drama ’15, Artist in Community Education ’16). He is also an emerging theatre artist and has acted in and directed performances in Kingston and Toronto.

07 June 2017

Otto Naumann, the leading name in Old Master paintings in North America, speaks at Grant Hall on Tuesday 6 June after receiving an honorary degree from Queen’s University.

From left to right: Jan Allen, Director of Agnes Etherington Art Centre; Otto Naumann; Stephanie Dickey, Professor and Bader Chair in Northern Baroque Art and Jacquelyn N. Coutré, Bader Curator / Researcher of European Art.

Dr Otto Naumann met with graduate students from Queen’s Department of Art History and Art Conservation in The Bader Gallery, generously offering insights into masterpieces in the exhibition “Alfred Bader Collects.”

Queen’s University conferred an honorary degree on Otto Naumann, in recognition of his distinguished contributions to the field of European art history. Dr Naumann is a renowned dealer of Old Master paintings, and a generous mentor and connoisseur. He has played a pivotal role in working with Drs Alfred and Isabel Bader to shape The Bader Collection at the Agnes.

Learn more here.

16 May 2017

Agnes staff welcomed Peg Dunnem as our new Program Coordinator on 1 May 2017.

Dunnem brings to the role seven years of experience as Curator of Education at Gallery Stratford in Stratford, ON. Following completion of a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Studio Art and Art History at Indiana University, she worked extensively in public art, art education and textile design in Chicago, Illinois. Her success in creating, leading and facilitating public programs has brought her an OAAG award nomination in education and a City of Stratford Woman of the Year in Arts nomination. Dunnem’s achievements in programming include initiating grant-funded opportunities for seniors, people with disabilities, youth and multicultural communities. In her role at the Agnes, she is excited about creating new opportunities for engaging with both the Queen’s and Kingston communities.

13 February 2017

Charles Frederick Gibson, The Royal Artillery Encampment at Kingston, around 1832, pencil and watercolour on paper. Purchase, Chancellor Richardson Memorial Fund, Susan M. Bazely, John Grenville, Brian S. Osborne and Joan M. Schwartz, 2016. Photo: © Christie’s Images

With the generous support of local donors and the Chancellor Richardson Memorial Fund, the Agnes Etherington Art Centre recently acquired, from a London UK auction, six important early views of Kingston by Major Charles Frederick Gibson (1808–1868). Gibson began his military career in 1825 with a commission as Ensign in the 66th Berkshire Regiment of Foot. In 1827, he sailed to North America and, for the next six years, was variously stationed in Upper and Lower Canada (today Ontario and Quebec). After serving in Ireland, Gibraltar and Malta, he returned to Canada in 1841 with his new bride, Barbara Fraser, to assume employment as Assistant Military Secretary in Halifax, where he was promoted to Captain. In 1845, Gibson departed for England, thus ending his stint in British North America.

Gibson produced numerous drawings and paintings while based in the UK, Mediterranean and Canada, including Kingston between 1831 and 1833. His artistic activity, however, is lesser known than that of military colleagues, such as James Pattison Cockburn (1779–1847) and Edward Charles Frome (1802–1890), both of whom were also roaming the streets of the garrison town at the same time. Until the recent auction, the bulk of Gibson’s production had been kept by descendants in Britain. Carefully rendered in pencil, ink and watercolour, his scenes offer a fresh perspective on Kingston’s changing townscape and military presence.

The Royal Artillery Encampment at Kingston, for example, presents a scene unique to existing artistic works from the period, with military tents dotting the east side of Point Henry overlooking Deadman Bay. This was possibly the camp created out of epidemic necessity in 1832. In Events of a Military Life, Walter Henry, surgeon to the forces, recounted that cholera had reached Kingston on 17 June. In order to isolate the disease, “a camp was formed on the hill near Fort Henry, and the barrack gates were shut.” Married military men and their families, in particular, were moved to healthier grounds.

07 December 2016

Ch. Bertrand, Day Dress  (detail), 1908–1912, silk. Gift of Edith van Straubenzee, 1963 (C63-561.2)

Sophia Zweifel, the new Isabel Bader Fellow in Textile Conservation and Research, holds graduate degrees in both Art History and Art Conservation from University College London, UK, and Queen’s University, Kingston, respectively. She also brings conservation experience with various public and private institutions, including the Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI); Conservation of Sculpture, Monuments and Objects (CMSO); McCord Museum; Canadian Museum of History; and Canadian Centre for Architecture. Most recently, Zweifel was part of a team at CCI that conserved Fannie Parlee’s 1860s Confederation Quilt, comprising leftover silk and velvet pieces from gowns fashioned for attendees of the Charlottetown Conference galas.

Gennifer Majors is the 2017 Isabel Bader Graduate Intern in Textile Conservation and Research. Majors has a Masters of Philosophy in Textile Conservation from the University of Glasgow, UK. For the past year, she was the Conservation Fellow at The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, where she worked with the newly donated Bea Roberts collection of Chinese minority textiles. Majors has also interned in the Costume and Textile Conservation Department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

The winning 2017 Fellowship project, proposed by Zweifel, combines social and material history with conservation treatment and analysis. Zweifel, with Majors’s assistance, will use the Queen’s University Collection of Canadian Dress at the Agnes to investigate cleaning and care practices of garments in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, highlighting a domestic history that is often overlooked. Techniques of textile conservation will be applied to analyze traces of those processes that remain on the objects. Prior to their collection by museums, many textiles have had a long history of extreme maintenance to keep them looking clean and new, as social constructs demanded. Recent conservation methodology, however, has come to accept and preserve signs of wear and soiling as part of a garment’s lived history. This project explores how current efforts to preserve these signs contest with historical efforts to remove them.

Knowledge gained about the collection during the fellowship and graduate internship will be disseminated through blog posts and other social media platforms. The residency of Sophia Zweifel and Gennifer Majors at Queen’s University will also provide students in the Master of Art Conservation Program with opportunities for learning and interaction in the field of textile conservation and study.

The Isabel Bader Fellowship and Graduate Internship in Textile Conservation and Research link two unique resources: the Queen’s University Collection of Canadian Dress at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre and the Master of Art Conservation, Canada’s only graduate degree in conservation theory and treatment.

05 December 2016

This book explores Canadian artist Brendan Fernandes’s mediation of dance and Western collections of African art. It extends his cross-disciplinary 2016 Agnes exhibition Brendan Fernandes: Lost Bodies, curated by Contemporary Art Curator Sunny Kerr, developed in partnership with the Textile Museum of Canada, and presented at the Agnes 9 January–10 April 2016. The publication includes essays by specialists in art performance, dance history and African art: Delinda Collier, Kevin D. Dumouchelle, Amanda Gilvin, Amanda Jane Graham, Erica P. Jones and Nat Trotman. The publication’s striking design was created by Lauren Wickware, Hamilton, in consultation with the artist. This exhibition is on view at the Textile Museum of Canada in Toronto until 19 March 2017.

Collection-based exhibitions are platforms for vital conversations. Lost Bodies brought artist Brendan Fernandes’s visual and choreographic work into dialogue with two of the country’s best collections of African art: The Justin and Elisabeth Lang Collection of African Art at the Agnes and the collection of the Textile Museum of Canada (TMC). Starting with the body as a place of knowing, Fernandes offered multiple points of connection that drew upon traditional costume, gestures of ballet and the choreographies of the vault. With this fresh approach to re-presenting African artifacts, he invoked a long-absent live-ness and reconsidered selections from both collections in a set of new video, print and spatial intercessions. Fernandes’s montage of classical dance and the collected object was concentrated around precise body language that raised questions about the visual and discursive habits that shape understandings of African art within Western museums. The exhibition Lost Bodies received the Ontario Association of Art Galleries’ 2016 Innovation in Collections-based Exhibitions Award.

Books can be purchased at the gallery, or call (613) 533.2190. Distributor: http://abcartbookscanada.com

ISBN 978-1-55339-493-8; 128 pages, $27

For more information, please contact Kate Yüksel, Administrative Coordinator, at (613) 533.2190 or kate.yuksel@queensu.ca.

17 November 2016

For the Winter Season Launch in 2016, Brendan Fernandes mesmerized audiences with In Touch, a solo dance performed in the galleries by Lua Shayenne. Photo: Tim Forbes

Visitors enhance their experience of the exhibition The Artist Herself through the online component.

Screen shot from the award-winning interactive project designed by Studio Blackwell.

Jennifer Nicoll

The Ontario Association of Art Galleries (OAAG) has honoured the Agnes Etherington Art Centre with three major awards this year: Innovation in a Collections-Based Exhibition Award, Digital Project Award and Colleague of the Year Award. The Innovation in a Collections-Based Exhibition Award was given to Brendan Fernandes: Lost Bodies, a contemporary art project that sprang from the Justin and Elisabeth Lang Collection of African Art. The Digital Project Award for design was awarded to Studio Blackwell for the interactive and online component of The Artist Herself: Self-Portraits by Canadian Historical Women Artists. Jennifer Nicoll, Collections Manager and Exhibition Coordinator, was named Colleague of the Year. The winners of the 39th annual OAAG Awards were announced on Thursday, 17 November 2016 at the Gladstone Hotel in Toronto.

The OAAG Awards are annual, province-wide awards for artistic merit and excellence. They recognize excellence in exhibitions, publications, programs and community partnerships produced by Ontario’s public art galleries over the previous year.

Agnes Director Jan Allen reflected on this year’s Awards, “Such peer recognition of the quality of our work is a fantastic achievement. I’m completely delighted. These awards point to the success of the whole Agnes team; their ongoing enthusiasm, generous efforts and commitment to excellence are making an impact.”

INNOVATION IN A COLLECTIONS-BASED EXHIBITION AWARD

The Agnes was recognized for the exhibition Brendan Fernandes: Lost Bodies, curated by Contemporary Art Curator Sunny Kerr, developed in partnership with the Textile Museum of Canada, and presented at the Agnes 9 January–10 April 2016. This exhibition is now on view at the Textile Museum of Canada in Toronto.

Collection-based exhibitions are platforms for vital conversations. Lost Bodies brought artist Brendan Fernandes’s visual and choreographic work into dialogue with two of the country’s best collections of African art: The Justin and Elisabeth Lang Collection of African Art at the Agnes and the collection of the Textile Museum of Canada (TMC). From these collections, Fernandes selected objects with origins in former French West Africa and reconsidered them in a set of new video, print and spatial intercessions. He explored their postcolonial dynamics through ballet—a form of courtly deference that itself became professionalized in colonial France. Drawing upon his background as a former dancer, Fernandes attempted to invoke the lived experiences lost to African objects by mixing the legacies of this pivotal colonial moment. By re-articulating museum display through classical dance, Fernandes’s intervention allowed works from the Lang and TMC collections to perform differently—sometimes positioned as looking subjects, as bodies of queer mash-up, or as the objects of long overdue deference. The exhibition galvanized large audiences and invited new forms of participation across disciplines and in the wider community, and was a site for rich dialogue about museums, audience and postcolonial ethics and aesthetics.

DIGITAL PROJECT AWARD

The Digital Project Award is a design prize awarded to Kelsey Blackwell and Jonathan Gallivan of Studio Blackwell, Toronto, for the interactive and online component of The Artist Herself: Self-Portraits by Canadian Historical Women Artists, co-curated by Alicia Boutilier and Tobi Bruce and co-produced by the Agnes Etherington Art Centre and the Art Gallery of Hamilton. Pat Sullivan, Public Programs Manager at the Agnes, and Alicia Boutilier compiled the interpretive material for the digital project. Visitors to The Artist Herself were invited to learn more about three works in the exhibition: Pauline Johnson’s Performance Costume, Lady Marie-Reine-Josephte Belleau’s Sentiment Album, and Marion Wilson’s and Margaret Frank’s Button Blankets. This interactive component remains available on the Agnes website today. Studio Blackwell created a gorgeous, fluid online space that sensitively expanded on the exhibition content, bringing life to the extraordinary material culture of this exhibition.

COLLEAGUE OF THE YEAR AWARD

Through almost ten years at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Jennifer Nicoll has excelled in her dual role as Collections Manager and Exhibition Coordinator. While significantly advancing the storage rationalization and digitization of the Agnes collection of 16,000+ works, she has smoothly coordinated numerous loans, acquisitions and exhibitions. In addition, she has conscientiously and generously mentored future young professionals in the field of museum exhibitions and collections management. Under her guidance, students, interns and volunteers have gained hands-on experience in digitizing, inventorying, cataloguing, condition examining and re-housing collection and exhibition objects. This award recognizes Nicoll as an astute and thoughtful administrative powerhouse who always takes the time to further her professional knowledge, and to nurture and share with others.

07 October 2016

Agnes Director Jan Allen in front of the installation of Dave Kemp’s Data Collection. Photo: Tim Forbes

Detail view of Dave Kemp, Data Collection, 2009. Photographic installation; inkjet prints on Sintra, 28.9 x 40.3 cm (each of 101 parts). Gift of the artist, 2012 (55-008a-gggg)

Wally Dion, Seated Thunderbird, 2015. Circuit boards on plywood, nails, acrylic medium and pigment. 104 x 122 x 5.7 cm. Purchase, Art Centre Acquisitions Trust, 2015 (58-011)

On view in the Atrium through 30 April 2017

In conjunction with Queen’s University’s 175th anniversary and a cross-faculty series on Big Data (BD175), the Agnes presents two major art works that speak to the dataverse. Information about these pieces, which are drawn from the Agnes collection, may be found here.

Dave Kemp, Data Collection
This multi-part work from the Agnes collection by artist and Queen’s alumnus Dave Kemp (BSc ENG, 1997) complements the “Big Data 175” series of talks and events this fall and winter term. The piece probes individual attitudes to privacy through photo portraits of the wallet contents of 101 subjects. Each card represents a database, a striking and familiar mix of public/governmental and corporate caches.

Wally Dion, Seated Thunderbird
For artist Wally Dion (Saulteaux), the creation of an ancient sacred being from discarded computer processors reflects the renewal of enduring flows of power. Thunderbird takes on new forms for successive generations. His Thunderbird series is a reflection upon Indigenous systems of thought and their continuing relevance in the contemporary world.

20 September 2016

Emma Neale and Elaine MacKay discuss the Collection of Canadian Dress housed at the Agnes. Photo: Tim Forbes

2017 Isabel Bader Fellowship and Graduate Internship in Textile Conservation and Research

Experienced conservators and textile specialists are invited to submit proposals for the 2017 Isabel Bader Fellowship in Textile Conservation and Research. Recent graduates of conservation training programs are also encouraged to apply for the assisting position of Isabel Bader Graduate Internship in Textile Conservation and Research.

In existence since 2011, this exciting biennial program supports the study, care and treatment of Canadian historical costume and textiles. The Fellowship and Internship link two unique resources at Queen’s University: the textile collection (including the Queen’s University Collection of Canadian Dress) at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, and the Master of Art Conservation Program, Canada’s only graduate degree in conservation theory and treatment.

Application Deadline: 28 October 2016. Click on the documents below for more information.

The Isabel Bader Fellowship in Textile Conservation and Research Call for Proposals
The Isabel Bader Graduate Internship in Textile Conservation and Research Call for Applications

01 December 2015

Rembrandt van Rijn, Portrait of a Man with Arms Akimbo, 1658, oil on canvas, 107.4 x 87.0 cm, Gift of Alfred and Isabel Bader, 2015 (58-008). Photo courtesy of Otto Naumann, Ltd.

Queen’s University Principal Daniel Woolf announced today that philanthropists and collectors Alfred and Isabel Bader have donated Rembrandt’s Portrait of a Man with Arms Akimbo (1658) to the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. The piece is the third Rembrandt painting the Baders have donated to the Agnes, and among the most significant portraits from the artist’s late career. The gallery now possesses three of the six paintings by this master in Canadian collections. Portrait of a Man with Arms Akimbo, signed and dated 1658, is a significant portrait by the mature artist, and one of the last works from the artist’s late career to enter a public collection. It joins two other works by Rembrandt, Head of an Old Man in a Cap (c. 1630) and Head of a Man in a Turban (c. 1661), in the gallery’s permanent collection.

Dr. Jacquelyn N. Coutré, Bader Curator and Researcher of European Art at the Agnes, outlined key aspects of this addition to the gallery’s holdings, saying, “The painting is a beautiful demonstration of Rembrandt’s ability as a mature portraitist. Not only does the artist capture the powerful psychological presence of his sitter, but he does so with an incredible painterly energy. The distinguished provenance of the portrait, including the connoisseur Daniel Daulby and Barbara Piasecka Johnson, also confirms its importance. I very much look forward to presenting this painting to the public in the coming months.” The Agnes is making plans to exhibit Portrait of a Man with Arms Akimbo in May 2016.

Portrait of a Man with Arms Akimbo is the latest addition to The Bader Collection, which comprises more than 200 paintings, primarily of Dutch and Flemish origin. Agnes Director Jan Allen reflected on the impact of Drs Alfred and Isabel Bader’s generosity: “I’m tremendously grateful for this amazing gift. The Baders have brought great intelligence and care to their philanthropy at Queen’s, and this is most perfectly reflected at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. They have steadily, and with purpose, donated works of art that reveal the complex character of the Dutch Golden Age, capturing within our holdings a beautiful moment of artistic fluorescence, that is, a blossoming of invention and creative expression. Portrait of a Man with Arms Akimbo is a spectacular, crowning addition to The Bader Collection. Of immeasurable benefit, this painting will now be available for study and enjoyment as part of a collection held in the public trust.”

Two of Queen’s most generous benefactors, the Baders have established Queen’s as a destination in Canada for the research, study and enjoyment of Rembrandt and his circle. The collection at the Agnes is complemented by Bader Chairs in Northern and Southern Baroque Art, an outstanding doctoral program in art history, and the country’s only graduate art conservation program. The convergence of these resources make Queen’s a major destination for the study of Baroque art.

This gift brings further prominence to the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, which, in addition to The Bader Collection, is home to significant, high-quality collections in contemporary art, Canadian historical art, and smaller concentrations of African art, Indigenous art, and historical dress.

For further information, contact Diana Gore at (613) 533.6000 x 77049 or diana.gore@queensu.ca.

25 November 2015

Winter 2015 Season Launch reception. Photo: Tim Forbes

Installation view of Charles Stankievech: Monument as Ruin. Photo: Tim Forbes

Installation view of Charles Stankievech: Monument as Ruin. Photo: Tim Forbes

The Ontario Association of Art Galleries (OAAG) has awarded the Agnes Etherington Art Centre a 2015 Exhibition of the Year Awards for Charles Stankievech: Monument as Ruin. The 38th annual OAAG Awards winners were announced on Wednesday, 18, November 2015 at the Gladstone Hotel in Toronto.

The OAAG Awards are annual, province-wide awards for artistic merit and excellence. They recognize the new exhibitions, publications, programs and community partnerships produced by Ontario’s public art galleries over the previous year. The Agnes was recognized for the exhibition Charles Stankievech: Monument as Ruin, curated by Contemporary Art Curator Sunny Kerr and presented at the Agnes 10 January–12 April 2015. Also cited in the award were artist Charles Stankievech, Exhibition Coordinator Jennifer Nicoll, Preparator Scott Wallis and Assistant Preparator Mark Birksted.

Agnes Director Jan Allen reflected on the Award, “We are extremely proud of this extraordinary project, which fully exposed the power of Charles Stankievech’s art. The realization of Monument as Ruin stretched us, mobilizing the creative powers of gallery staff in new ways. Receiving peer recognition for our contemporary art program through this Award is immensely gratifying.”

THE EXHIBITION
Featuring new work by Charles Stankievech, the exhibition probed twentieth-century military forms and the ways in which they shaped spaces of conflict. Monument as Ruin used video, photography and sculpture to examine WWII-era defense infrastructures including colossal acoustic mirrors built to listen for enemy planes before WWII and bunkers built by the Nazis lining the French, Belgian and Dutch coasts during WWII.

Playing with scale and blurring the line between documentation and invention, Stankievech created an immersive sonic space that invoked past military strategies, and questioned their meaning in relation to today’s landscape of non-territorially bounded conflict.

The exhibition was accompanied by a broadsheet publication, “The Centre Cannot Hold,” with essays by Charles Stankievech and Queen’s University Canada Research Chair in Surveillance David Murakami Wood, furthering Stankievech’s intentions in this work “to facilitate conversations about military colonial strategies and surveillance operations.”

For more information, please contact Diana Gore, Administrative Coordinator, at (613) 533.2190 or diana.gore@queensu.ca.

16 October 2015

Image: Tim Forbes

The Agnes Etherington Art Centre has received a substantial grant of $261,937 from the Museum Assistance Program (MAP) of the Department of Canadian Heritage. The grant, the largest received by the gallery from this source, will be allocated over a three-year period. It supports an exhibition of extraordinary graphite drawings under the title Drawing from the Past: Picturing Inuit Modernity in the North Baffin Region, 1964. The show will be featured at the Agnes in 2017, with a national tour to follow.

Created in partnership with the Canadian Museum of History and the Piqqusilirivvik Inuit Cultural Learning Facility in Clyde River, Nunavut, Drawing from the Past will examine a tumultuous era in the history of Canada’s Arctic through the display and interpretation of a unique collection of Inuit drawings made in 1964. The drawings, created by Inuit men and women from the North Baffin communities of Clyde River, Pond Inlet, and Arctic Bay, eloquently document the thoughts, apprehensions, memories and observations of Nunavummiut during a time of profound social upheaval. They entered the collection of the Canadian Museum of History in 2014.

Queen’s National Scholar and Curator of Indigenous Art Dr. Norman Vorano will lead this ambitious project. Drawing from the Past: Picturing Inuit Modernity in the North Baffin Region, 1964 is the first effort to bring this collection to the public in thirty years. Dr. Vorano emphasizes the special opportunity this project represents, saying, “The partnership with Piqqusilirivvik will ensure an informed, culturally rich interpretive framework for presenting these drawings, and opens a new channel of engagement with Canada’s Aboriginal population. Reflecting contemporary discussions in curatorial practice, the exhibition seeks a re-alignment of the relationship between Indigenous and settler perspectives on non-Western art through an emphasis upon the intangible elements of visual arts—the stories, memories and voices associated with the drawings.”

Agnes Director Jan Allen points out that the cultural exchange embedded in Drawing from the Past takes the work of the gallery in a new direction. “With the support of MAP and the help of our partners, these drawings—tangible traces of cross-cultural encounter from half a century ago—will come to life through reflective interviews with the people of their community of origin. In conceiving this project, Norman Vorano has cultivated a fresh collaborative approach that promises to be revelatory for all involved.”

In addition to his role at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Dr Vorano is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Art at Queen’s University.

For more information, please contact Diana Gore, Administrative Coordinator, at (613) 533.2190 or diana.gore@queensu.ca.

This project has been made possible in part by the Government of Canada. Ce projet a été rendu possible [en partie] grâce au gouvernement du Canada.

05 October 2015

The Agnes Etherington Art Centre at Queen’s is taking another step toward barrier-free access by creating a reserved parking spot on Bader Lane for visitors. We are happy to announce that we have secured an accessible parking spot on Bader Lane, close to University Avenue and adjacent to the gallery’s main entrance: look for the signed spot identified for permit #89. Agnes visitors who possess their own Ontario Accessible Parking Permit issued by the Ministry of Transportation can use this pass for this spot. The permit is available for booking in person at the reception desk, as well as through advance booking by email or by phone.

The gallery’s Director Jan Allen remarks, “The Agnes is committed to being an inclusive community space with accessible facilities that respect the dignity and independence of those with limited mobility. Parking can be a huge issue, so we’re delighted to offer this new location for our visitors so all can enjoy our exhibitions and programs.”

For more information, please contact Diana Gore, Administrative Coordinator, at (613) 533.2190 x 77049 or diana.gore@queensu.ca. To book the parking spot please contact Reception at aeac@queensu.ca or (613) 533.2190.

24 September 2015

Image: Emily Carr, Kitwancool Totems, 1928, oil on canvas. Hart House Art Collection, University of Toronto. Gift of the Graduating Year of 1929. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Iconic Canadian Art Today: Curating the Hart House Collection and Emily Carr

On Sunday, 4 October at 2 pm join Dr Christine Boyanoski, curator of A Story of Canadian Art: As Told by the Hart House Collection, and Sarah Milroy, art critic and co-curator of From the Forest to the Sea: Emily Carr in British Columbia for the annual Frances K. Smith Public Talks in Canadian Art. Admission is free; a reception follows.

A Story of Canadian Art contains forty well-known works of early twentieth-century Canadian art from the permanent collection of Hart House, University of Toronto. Boyanoski will examine their acquisition, their installation in Hart House and their subsequent exhibition histories to understand how these paintings have taken on the iconic status they hold today. From the Forest to the Sea: Emily Carr in British Columbia illuminated Carr’s immense legacy, her connection to the Canadian and international artistic developments of her day, and her allegiance to the First Nations cultures that inspired her. Milroy will discuss her efforts to free Carr’s legacy from the clichés and distortions that have developed in the course of her canonization, making her available for fresh viewing today. After their short presentations, they will engage in a conversation about these issues and then answer questions from the audience.

Dr Christine Boyanoski is an independent curator, writer and lecturer based in Toronto. She has curated many exhibitions and written extensively on the subject of Canadian art. Among her current projects is a study of cultural decolonization in the settler societies of the former British Empire between the two World Wars.

Sarah Milroy is a Toronto writer and art critic. She is the co-founder of the Canadian Art Foundation, and served as editor and publisher of Canadian Art magazine (1991–1996) as well as chief art critic for The Globe and Mail (2001–2010).

The Frances K. Smith Lecture in Canadian Art will take place Sunday, 4 October 2015, 2–4 PM, at the Agnes. A reception will follow. This event is made possible by an endowment from Frances K. Smith and family.

02 September 2015

Charles Stankievech, Monument as Ruin (Wreck), 2011, photograph. Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Grants program and the J. Stuart Fleming Fund (Queen’s University), 2015 (58-004)

Margaux Williamson, At night I painted in the kitchen, 2014, Oil on canvas. Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Grants program and the Art Centre Acquisitions Endowment Fund (Queen’s University), 2015 (58-003.01)

Margaux Williamson, We loved the world and the things in the world, 2014, Oil on wood. Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Grants program and the Art Centre Acquisitions Endowment Fund (Queen’s University), 2015 (58-003.02)

This summer, the Canada Council for the Arts awarded the Agnes Etherington Art Centre an Acquisitions Grant of $18,500 to support purchase of a photographic work by artist Charles Stankievech and two paintings by Queen’s University alumna, Margaux Williamson. Additional funding was provided by the J. Stuart Fleming Fund and the Art Centre Acquisitions Endowment Fund, both at Queen’s University.

Curator of Contemporary Art Sunny Kerr notes, “The works of Charles Stankievech and Margaux Williamson fulfill the Agnes’ mandate of ensuring dynamic representation in our holdings of Canadian contemporary art; they add significantly to our pool of work by rising artists who are making a real impact. The Agnes Etherington Art Centre has sustained a strong record of and commitment to collecting, exhibiting and interpreting contemporary Canadian art since 1957: I’m glad to have the support of the Canada Council in building on that legacy.”

The Agnes contemporary art collection focuses on key turning points, movements and current issues in the Canadian context. The exhibition of Stankievech’s Monument as Ruin in winter 2015 marked a shift in the Agnes’ programming, and in wider research-driven practices; Monument as Ruin (Wreck) was central to that body of work. This photograph is the first work by Charles Stankievech to enter the Agnes collection, where it joins other works with thematic ties to war, surveillance and military history. Williamson’s At night I painted in the kitchen is the largest painting in her 2014 project entitled I Could See Everything, which conjures a Promethean narrative driven by the desire to remake the world and the wavering power of art. Her We loved the world and the things in the world is a small, powerful self-portrait.

Visit the Agnes online collections for more details about Monument as Ruin (Wreck) by Charles Stankievech and Margaux Williamson’s At night I painted in the kitchen and We loved the world and the things in the world. For more information, please contact Diana Gore, Administrative Coordinator, at (613) 533.2190 or diana.gore@queensu.ca

We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country.

19 August 2015

Jan Victors, Ruth and Naomi, 1653, oil on canvas, 108.6 x 137.2 cm, Purchase, Bader Acquisition Fund, 2015 (58-002). Photo courtesy of Sotheby’s, Inc.

A recently acquired painting by Jan Victors, an artist in the orbit of Rembrandt around 1640, has arrived at the Agnes. Ruth and Naomi (1653) is the first work by the artist to enter the collection, and it enhances the gallery’s great strength in paintings by Rembrandt and his followers. The painting will be exhibited in the summer of 2017, when it will feature in an exhibition celebrating fifty years of Dr. Alfred Bader’s gifts and contributions to the Agnes.

Ruth and Naomi depicts one of the most poignant moments in the Old Testament. The Book of Ruth (1:15-17) tells of the Israelite Naomi, widowed and living with her recently widowed Moabite daughters-in-law, who urges them to leave her to her solitude and return to their people. Orpah, visible in the lower left corner retreating into the distance, obeys the command, but Ruth remains steadfast in her allegiance to Naomi. Bader Curator/Researcher of European Art Dr Jacquelyn N. Coutré explains, “In her proclamation of ‘whither thou goest, I will go; and whither thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God,’ Ruth provokes perceptible ambivalence in the elderly Naomi: the latter does not wish to part with her daughter-in-law but she desires that Ruth find happiness with another husband. Victors effectively communicates the emotional bond that transcends blood relation through the concentrated gazes, proximity of the heads, and intertwined hands of the two women. Full of dramatic gestures that communicate the story with a palpable immediacy, this painting is a beautiful evocation of family loyalty and female solidarity, as well as religious conversion.”

The painting was acquired through the generous support of the Bader Acquisition Fund.

06 August 2015

Youth participating in stop-motion workshop

Mask Making workshop participant

Ulrich Panzer studio shot, photo courtesy of the artist

The Agnes Etherington Art Centre is pleased to announce it is the recipient of a $75,000 Operating Grant from the City of Kingston Arts Fund (CKAF), as well as an anonymous gift through the Community Foundation for Kingston and Area (CFKA). These funds will directly support the gallery’s programming.

Agnes Director Jan Allen emphasized that these contributions enable the Agnes to promote artists and their work through exhibition, programming and acquisition, and to create opportunities for the best artists of the region to lead and teach. She points out, “While the Agnes relies on a number of funding sources, the City of Kingston Arts Fund Operating Grant is critical in enabling the gallery to thrive as an anchor for the regional art community, and as an accessible space for encounter with the best visual art of our time. In addition, funds provided by the Community Foundation for Kingston and Area underpin our work in community outreach and education: we’re proud to be among the local organizations receiving much needed support through this visionary body.”

In the coming months Agnes visitors can look forward to superb programming: contemporary works by Vancouver-based artist-in-residence Judy Radul and local artist Ulrich Panzer, Canadian historical masterpieces from the Hart House Collection, paintings by The Kingston Prize winners, and a fascinating look into the early work of Carl Beam. Additionally, there will be innovative talks and public programs, like the brand-new ArtZone initiative, a free drop-in after-school program for artistically-inclined youth in the fall of 2015.

14 July 2015

Christaodoulos Panayiotou’s work in Two Days After Forever.

Curator of Contemporary Art Sunny Kerr visited the 56th International Art Exhibition in Venice in June. The trip allowed him to research contemporary artists at an event that gathers the global contemporary art worlds into one dramatic setting.

Sunny’s favourite exhibition experience at this year’s Biennale, Slip of the Tongue, was curated by artist Danh Vō in collaboration with Caroline Bourgeois at Punta Della Dogana / Francois Pinault Foundation. Vō’s signature exquisitely sensitive approach to space made this installation a stand out. Another highlight of this exhibition was meeting the Pinault Foundation’s Head of Exhibitions, Marco Ferraris, along with instructor Julie Hollenbach and her class of Queen’s students studying in Venice in Art History 380 (Venice and Its Biennale). Sunny presented a talk to the Venice Summer School students on what curating entails and his role at the Agnes, and, after visiting the Biennale’s main pavilion with the class, led a discussion about interpretations of the show and the intentions of Biennale curator, Okwui Enwezor.

Among other highlights, Sunny was drawn to the work 2008 by Christaodoulos Panayiotou in his Cypress Pavilion solo show titled Two Days After Forever featuring shredded Cypriot pounds acquired when Cyprus joined the Eurozone. In the tradition of artists referring to the Biennale’s host city, Panayiotou also showed handmade shoes created from fake designer handbags sold on the streets of Venice.

15 June 2015

Mike Bayne, White Building, 2007, oil on masonite panel.  Purchase, Donald Murray Shepherd Bequest Fund, 2012 (55-002) Photo: Bernard Clark

In an exciting step extending access to the rich collections of the Agnes, the first phase of the Agnes Online Collections Initiative is now available for browsing and searching. Over the past six months, with the help of a Development Grant through the Elizabeth L. Gordon Art Program (through the Ontario Arts Foundation), a small team led by Collections Manager Jennifer Nicoll prepared images and documentation for nearly 2500 works of art to create an accessible virtual vault of art treasures.

Gallery Director Jan Allen explained the drive to create an enduring online repository, “Art museums today are embracing public demand and interest in exploring collections virtually, and the Agnes is no exception. We’re eager to share our extraordinary collections, to make them available locally and globally to everyone with access to the internet. This initiative builds on past efforts, and extends and synthesizes these in a major upgrade to our new web platform”

In this first phase of an ambitious digitization program, the team focused on recently acquired and high-demand works. Featured material includes the gallery’s renowned collections of Canadian and European historical art, contemporary art, and African Art. All works acquired in the past decade are presented, as well as important Canadian artworks acquired through significant donations by Ruth Soloway, and Ayala and Samuel Zacks, and major contemporary art purchases made with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition grant and Queen’s University’s Chancellor Richardson Memorial Fund, established to further the study of Canada. Signature items from the Historical Quilt Collection and the Queen’s University Collection of Canadian dress have been added.

Jennifer Nicoll points out another benefit of posting complete and accessible records for rare art and artifacts: “Digitization contributes to the preservation of the artworks by reducing the need for handling and resulting wear and tear when these objects are examined. By offering easily retrievable information and high quality images, this initiative has improved our capacity to use technology to further enhance and support our collection and programs.”

The Agnes on-line searchable collections attract many users, from members of the general public to artists, art historians, researchers and scholars from varied fields, teachers, students of any age, museum professionals and collecting institutions. Jan Allen affirms, “This work is crucial to the gallery’s vitality. There is a tremendous potential here. As resources are found, we will push forward to make our collections, and our research and artistic contributions fully available online.”

14 May 2015

Dr Jacquelyn N. Coutré

Dr Jacquelyn N. Coutré arrived at Queen’s University in Kingston last month to complete the Agnes Etherington Art Centre team of curatorial specialists. Gallery director Jan Allen emphasized, “We’re extremely glad to welcome Jacquelyn Coutré to Queen’s as Bader Curator/Researcher of European Art: she is an excellent scholar and a beautiful fit for cultivating fresh understandings of The Bader Collection.”

An expert in the art of Jan Lievens, Dr Coutré will work with the Agnes’s celebrated holdings of European art, which features the world’s largest concentration of paintings by this celebrated artist of the Dutch Golden Age. She holds a PhD from New York University and brings to the gallery thirteen years of museum experience garnered at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; and, most recently, the Indianapolis Museum of Art. An accomplished researcher and interpreter of the art of the Baroque period, Dr Coutré is particularly interested in the ways in which works of art reflect the social, political and economic realities of their time.

Dr Coutré is already busy with the collection, familiarizing herself with its character and researching potential acquisitions. She reflects on the possibilities before her, saying, “The Agnes offers an outstanding opportunity to produce intellectually robust exhibitions, publications, and dialogues focusing on European historical painting. The Bader Collection—Queen’s is the only institution in Canada with two Rembrandt paintings—has incredible potential to intensify student engagement with art. As an extension of this work, I’m eager to explore partnerships with other institutions in Canada and internationally to develop the profile of this singular group of paintings in relationship to other fine collections.”

The Bader Collection comprises over 200 paintings spanning the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries, with a focus on Dutch and Flemish paintings of the Baroque era, including two character study paintings by Rembrandt. The collection, donated to Queen’s University by philanthropists Dr Alfred Bader and Dr Isabel Bader over the past four decades, includes paintings by Rembrandt’s associate Jan Lievens and major works by such important Rembrandt pupils as Govert Flinck, Willem Drost and Aert de Gelder. The quality of these works has brought international renown to the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. Paintings by El Greco, Dosso Dossi, Luca Giordano, Georg Pencz and Sebastien Bourdon represent other European schools at a similarly significant level.

13 May 2015

Creating an ArtZone: The Community Foundation for Kingston and Area supports innovative program for teens at the Agnes

The Community Foundation for Kingston and Area (CFKA) has awarded a grant to ArtZone, a new program for teens that will be offered at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre in the fall of 2015. ArtZone is a free drop-in after-school art program for youth ages 14–18 being offered in the beautiful André Biéler Studio of the Agnes. Kingston artists will lead this program for artistically-inclined youth who want to explore materials and ideas in-depth in a setting that will encourage creative expression and build skills. This ten-week pilot program will run from September to December 2015, on Thursdays, 3 to 5 pm.

Agnes Director Jan Allen describes the origins of the project, “In keeping with Kingston’s Youth Strategy, we realized we could address youth interests and improve access to our programs by creating a free youth-friendly space at the gallery. The CFKA grant will assist us in paying professional artists to facilitate art projects in the studio, subsidize teens’ travel to the Agnes, and provide materials and light refreshments in a welcoming, inspiring milieu.”

“This is a new format for the Agnes, and offers outreach to Kingston’s teens in an informal open structure that suits their leisure-time needs,” said Pat Sullivan, Public Programs Manager, who developed the project with input from artists, educators and youth. “It will be wonderful to see more youth engaging with art in our exhibitions, and exploring new materials and techniques in the studio. We are very grateful to the CFKA for its support.”

The grant of $3489 is awarded through the Edward Ratcliffe Fund and the Marla and Gregg Rosen Fund.

24 March 2015

Elaine MacKay and Emma Neale discuss a piece in the Collection of Canadian Dress with a Master of Art Conservation student. Photo: Tim Forbes

Emma Neale and Elaine MacKay examine a piece in the Collection of Canadian Dress housed at the Agnes. Photo: Tim Forbes

Emma Neale, Elaine MacKay and Curator of Canadian Historical Art, Alicia Boutilier discuss the Collection of Canadian Dress housed at the Agnes. Photo: Tim Forbes

Elaine MacKay with a piece from the Collection of Canadian Dress housed at the Agnes. Photo: Tim Forbes

Dress historian Elaine MacKay and textile conservator Emma Neale have been uncovering the lives of nineteenth-century Kingston women through the fashions they wore. Photo: Tim Forbes

Dress historian Elaine MacKay and textile conservator Emma Neale have been discovering the lives of nineteenth-century Kingston women through the fashions they wore. Until April, MacKay and Neale are in residence at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre and in Queen’s Art Conservation Program as the 2015 Isabel Bader Fellow and Intern in Textile Conservation and Research. A gown worn by Laura Roche at her coming out party; Eliza Gordon’s new dress as she embarked on a new chapter of her life wedded to Rev. D. M. Gordon; and an outfit owned by Mrs. W. R. P. Bridger, wife of a Royal Military College professor: these are the figures that have been populating MacKay’s in-depth research. “Clothing is fundamental to a woman’s self-image,” she says, and can be used to read biography. But MacKay is not just interested in the dress alone; she is investigating the whole ensemble, accessories and all, for a more complete understanding of the messages that clothing conveys at different stages in a woman’s life.

In her work, MacKay is ably assisted by Neale, who brings her high-level conservation training to bear in the meticulous reconstruction, repair and cleaning of the historical garments. At the final stage, the ensembles are brought back to life through professional mounting. This focused project not only raises the profile of the Queen’s University Collection of Canadian Dress housed at the Agnes, but also deepens understanding of Canada’s sartorial history and material culture.

The Isabel Bader Fellowship and Internship in Textile Conservation and Research are awarded to two successful applicants every two years and generously sponsored by Dr Isabel Bader.

21 January 2015

The Agnes Etherington Art Centre at Queen’s partners with Kingston’s independent cinema, The Screening Room, to present the award-winning documentary The New Rijksmuseum in a one-time-only showing on Wednesday 28 January, at 6 pm. This engrossing film follows the decade-long story of the refurbishment of Amsterdam’s beloved national museum, home to many paintings by the renowned Dutch master Rembrandt van Rijn. Director Oeke Hoogendijk captures the travails of directors, curators, press officers, architects and government officials as they struggle to complete the visionary project. Even militant Amsterdam cyclists, fighting to maintain their favoured route through the 19th-century building’s venerable arches, have their say. In spite of many bureaucratic setbacks, chronicled with sensitivity and humour in this engaging film, the museum re-opened in the spring of 2013, and art-lovers are again pouring in to admire the creations of the Dutch Golden Age.

The New Rijksmuseum is the 2014 winner of the Beeld en Geluid IDFA Award for Dutch Documentary, whose jurors praised it as “A wonderful portrait that lets art conquer the mechanics of adversity.”

Dr Stephanie S Dickey, Bader Chair in Northern Baroque Art, Art History Program, Queen’s University, will give a short introduction to the film, which is presented in conjunction with the Agnes exhibition Artists in Amsterdam.

The documentary is 216 minutes long, so will be shown with an intermission. Beer and wine will be available for this screening. $10 general admission / $8 seniors & students. Advance tickets can be purchased at: http://screeningroomkingston.com/special-event-the-new-rijksmuseum/ The Screening Room is located at 120 Princess Street, Kingston.

To read reviews of the film, please see www.filmstransit.com

For more information, please contact Pat Sullivan at (613) 533.2190 or pat.sullivan@queensu.ca.

 

14 January 2015

Don Maynard, Smoke Signal #1, 2004, copper and aluminum. Gift of artist, 2007 (50-023)

Rebecca Soudant, A Tapestry of Birth, 2011, cotton and silk embroidery thread, marker and acrylic on cotton. Gift of Rebecca Soudant and Jim McCullough, 2011 (54-016)

Two accomplished artists in the region, Don Maynard and Rebecca Soudant, will speak at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre at Queen’s on Sunday, 25 January, from 2 to 3 pm. Each will present a short slide presentation on their current projects, followed by talks on their works on view in the exhibition I hope humanity . . .: Maynard’s dramatic sculpture Smoke Signal #1 and Soudant’s exquisite A Tapestry of Birth. Admission for this special event is free, and light refreshments will follow.

Rebecca Soudant is a Kingston-based artist who teaches Visual Arts at Smiths Falls Collegiate. She has created works in paint, print, fabric and metal; for the last four years, embroidery has been the focus of her practice. She is currently working on a parenting tapestry and another about Kingston community gardens.

Recently re-located to Picton, Ontario, Don Maynard is working on two public art commissions: Wave for the City of Toronto and Stand of Birch for the Cyrville Station of the Ottawa Light Rail Transit Line. Previous public art works include Archive and Fallen Star for the City of Ottawa. The Agnes featured his solo exhibition, Franken Forest, in 2010. Maynard has upcoming exhibitions at the Art Gallery of Mississauga and at Newzones Gallery of Contemporary Art in Calgary.

Programs for I hope humanity . . . are supported by the Community Foundation for Kingston and Area. For more information, please contact Pat Sullivan at (613) 533.2190 or pat.sullivan@queensu.ca.

10 December 2014

Pat Sullivan, Public Programs Manager, discusses a work in I hope humanity . . . with grade 3 and 4 students.

Grade 6/7 students use tinfoil to make facial moulds in a mask-making project after looking at African art.

The Agnes played host to two elementary classes last fall as part of Beyond Classrooms Kingston. A Grade 6–7 class from Holy Name Catholic School and a Grade 3–4 class from Mother Teresa Catholic School each spent a week based in the André Biéler Studio. The teachers used our exhibitions as a springboard for collaborative and inquiry-based learning in a range of subjects from art to mathematics.

03 October 2014

In a new partnership with Kingston’s education community, the Agnes Etherington Art Centre at Queen’s has been chosen as a host site for three local elementary classes in the Beyond Classrooms program that brings teachers and their students into the community for a week-long learning experience. While teaching their regular curriculum, teachers will use exhibitions and gallery resources as a springboard for collaborative and inquiry-based learning.

The first session takes place during the week of 6–10 October, when Dianne LaFortune and her Grade 6–7 class from Holy Name Catholic School arrive. Later in the month, Anthony Cox, from Mother Teresa Catholic School, will be at the Agnes with his Grade 3–4 class, and, in May 2015, Randy Archer will bring his Grade 7–8 class, also from Holy Name Catholic School. Each class will be based in the light-filled André Biéler Studio, with frequent forays into the adjacent exhibitions to learn about the works of art and the nature of a public art gallery. Students will create art, fill their journals and speak with Agnes staff about their work.

“I’m thrilled that Beyond Classrooms has reached Kingston,” said Pat Sullivan, Public Programs Manager. “I’ve been aware of this program since its beginning as Open Minds in Calgary in the early 1990s. It offers a wonderful enriching experience for students. I commend Linda Lamoureux, the local Coordinator, for her efforts in organizing this exceptional opportunity with the School Boards and teachers.” In Kingston, Beyond Classrooms is a collaborative initiative of the Limestone District and the Algonquin and Lakeshore District School Boards through the Kingston Area Museums, Historical Sites and Galleries organization.

For more information, see http://www.kingstonmuseums.ca/node/261, or contact Pat Sullivan at (613) 533.2190 or pat.sullivan@queensu.ca.

04 September 2014

The Agnes Etherington Art Centre and Master of Art Conservation Program, Queen’s University, are pleased to announce M. Elaine MacKay as the recipient of the 2015 Isabel Bader Fellowship in Textile Conservation and Research. She will be in-residence at Queen’s through the winter 2015 semester. See details.

 

03 September 2014

DEREK SULLIVAN:
Problems That Arise from Continually Confusing Left & Right
Opening Reception: 13 September 3:30­­–5 pm

On Saturday, 13 September, all are invited to the Agnes for a reception celebrating the completion of this dramatic work in the Atrium, and will have the opportunity to meet artist Derek Sullivan, who will be onsite for the duration, and the artists who assisted him in creating the work. Refreshments will be provided.

This new commission builds upon the Art Centre’s acquisition last year of Derek Sullivan’s piece #32, Le poeme de l’angle droit, Corridor, Folding Stair, an accent misstep. Problems That Arise from Continually Confusing Left & Right retains Sullivan’s careful handmade method and conceptual rigor but also signals a shift in approach, through its monumental scale and attention to the site of the artwork. Occupying a space above the gallery’s reception desk that might normally be used for wayfinding, Sullivan’s drawing raises the problem of mixing up directions from our fluctuating “central” position. “The title,” says Sullivan, “refers to my own difficulty of remembering left and right (it has got me into many troubles over the years).” This large-scale drawing is slated to remain on view for two years. Subsequent versions of Problems… will be composed using a template and a set of instructions provided by the artist for this conceptual in situ work.

Derek Sullivan is a Toronto-based artist whose work has been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions internationally at institutions including Galerie Emmanuel Hervé, Paris and the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Sullivan was twice recognized on the Sobey Art Award Ontario Long List and, in 2012, on the Sobey Art Award Short List.

Thanks are extended to the following artists for their generous assistance in the creation of the drawing: Jane Derby, Erin Milliken, Sara Perosa, Joan Scaglione, Anna Soper, and Aida Sulcs.

BONUS EVENT: Come early for Derek Sullivan’s launch to participate in the ArtsVote Kingston campaign launch at 2:30 to 3:30 pm, organized by the Advocacy Committee of the Kingston Arts Council in preparation for the upcoming municipal election.

This commission was made possible by Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Grants program and the Donald Murray Shepherd Bequest, Queen’s University, 2014

Image: Derek Sullivan, Problems That Arise from Continually Confusing Left & Right (in progress), 2014, coloured pencil on wall, (57-012).

For further information contact Emily Marshall at aeadmin@queensu.ca

28 August 2014

Homecoming Weekend
Friday–Sunday, 17–19 October

The Agnes offers free admission to alumni over Homecoming Weekend, with free guided tours at 11 am on Saturday and Sunday. We are open 10 am–4:30 pm on Friday, with extended hours (10 am–5 pm) on Saturday and Sunday.

Musée canadien des civilisations, Archives institutionnelles = Canadian Museum of Civilization, Institutional archives
28 August 2014

Dr. Norman Vorano has been appointed Queen’s National Scholar (QNS) in Indigenous visual and material cultures of the Americas in an innovative joint appointment to the Department of Art and the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. Beginning this fall, he will integrate teaching in art history with the collections and programs of the gallery, animating these while cultivating mutually beneficial links with Indigenous communities, and across disciplines. His expertise promises to transform the way our audiences experience Indigenous art.

Holding a PhD from the University of Rochester, Vorano has established an impressive record of fieldwork, research, teaching and curatorial achievement. In the study of Inuit art, he is acknowledged as a leading scholar of his generation. Prior to arriving at Queen’s in August, he led major research projects resulting in scholarly publications, exhibitions and public programs as Curator of Contemporary Inuit Art at the Canadian Museum of History (formerly the Canadian Museum of Civilization).

27 August 2014

In June we welcomed Sunny Kerr, an artist, educator, writer and curator, to the Agnes. A master of inventive collaboration and of stretching models of public engagement, he describes his curatorial vision and approach to the presentation of contemporary art as “responsive, flexible and rhizomatic.” Kerr brings to his role degrees from Queen’s University, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, and York University. A PhD candidate in Cultural Studies at Queen’s, he has taught at Ontario College of Art and Design University, the University of Toronto and Queen’s. While in Toronto, Kerr animated the U of T Art Centre as an education coordinator and curated artists’ projects with WayUpWayDown. Since arriving in Kingston in 2010, he helped found Corridor Culture, served on the Board of Modern Fuel Artist-run Centre, spearheaded the Princess Towers Notions Group and participated in the city’s hottest new collective, Agitated Plover Salon. In 2013, he curated the Agnes exhibition, Déjà déjà visité: Mike Bayne, Jocelyn Purdie, Maayke Schurer.