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Residencies

Tau Lewis, 2018 Stonecroft Foundation Artist-in-Residence
Richard Ibghy and Marilou Lemmens, 2017 Stonecroft Foundation Artist-in-Residence
Ciara Phillips, Artist-in-Residence, 6 September–8 October 2016. Photo: Tim Forbes
Ciara Phillips, Artist-in-Residence, 6 September–8 October 2016. Photo: Tim Forbes
Derek Sullivan working on "Problems That Arise from Continually Confusing Left & Right"
Elaine MacKay and Emma Neale discuss a piece in the Collection of Canadian Dress with a Master of Art Conservation student. Photo: Tim Forbes
Internationally-acclaimed artist Lynne Marsh was in residence at the Agnes in the fall of 2013.
Patricia Ewer, the Isabel Bader Research Fellow in Textile Conservation at the Agnes in 2013 (right) with Brenna Cook, the Isabel Bader Graduate Intern in Textile Conservation.

The Agnes creates and supports creative artists’ and research residencies to deepen our research capacity, aligning with the research environment at Queen’s University, responding to our immediate civic context, and advancing the field at large.

Tau Lewis
2018 Stonecroft Foundation Artist-in-Residence

Tau Lewis

Tau Lewis Photo: Garrett Elliott

Tau Lewis is the 2018 Stonecroft Artist-in-Residence. This year’s 13-week residency (12 June–25 August and 16–28 September 2018) is a rich platform for her artmaking process; it offers an opportunity for public and academic audiences alike to connect with her work and ideas.

The program is generously supported by the Stonecroft Foundation for the Arts, the Queen’s University Department of Gender Studies through Dr Katherine McKittrick and the Queen’s Arts Fund–Visiting Artist in Residence, and the BFA (Visual Art) Program.

EXHIBITION: 25 August–2 December 2018
Tau Lewis: when last you found me here

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Richard Ibghy and Marilou Lemmens,
2017 Stonecroft Foundation Artist-in-Residence

Richard Ibghy & Marilou Lemmens.

Richard Ibghy & Marilou Lemmens. Photo: Tim Forbes

The acclaimed Québec-based collaborative duo Richard Ibghy & Marilou Lemmens was the Agnes Etherington Art Centre’s inaugural Stonecroft Foundation Artist-in-Residence. Their residency was hosted in collaboration with the Department of Film and Media Studies and supported by the Stonecroft Foundation for the Arts and the Queen’s Arts Fund – Visiting Artist in Residence.

The residency presented a chapter of the artists’ ongoing research-intensive project The Golden USB, that raises timely questions regarding the limits of commodification, including the ownership of Earth and the life forms that inhabit it. The residency was a pointed cross-fertilization between several disciplines, research-creation practices, and scholarly pursuits. Over the span of three months, the artists undertook research and production that responded to the cultural, historical and social landscapes of Queen’s University and the city of Kingston. They developed and invited a diverse committee of regional artists, technicians, poets and scholars to contribute, advise and organize “entries” into the Trade Catalogue of Everything, a digital file listing everything and anything—land, water, air, plants, animals, fragments of nature, but also the products of human culture, industry, invention and know-how—that may be of interest to alien life. Many of these entries resulted in new video works and installation features within the artists’ exhibition, The Golden USB, curated by Sunny Kerr, which, in turn, complemented and deepened the impact of their residency at the Agnes.

Take a virtual tour and view The Golden USB.

PRODUCTION: 24 April–19 May 2017

The Isabel Bader rehearsal room

The Isabel Bader rehearsal room

Video still from installation of The Golden USB. Photo: Paul Litherland

Video still of local poet, Sadiqa de Meijer, from installation of The Golden USB. Photo: Paul Litherland

Curator Sunny Kerr captured this view (above) of the artists working at Queen’s University’s Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy in consultation with Bernard Ziomkiewicz, Electronic Technologist.

Curator Sunny Kerr captured this view (above) of the artists working at Queen’s University’s Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy in consultation with Bernard Ziomkiewicz, Electronic Technologist.

Richard Ibghy and Marilou Lemmens at the Museum of Health Care

Richard Ibghy and Marilou Lemmens at the Museum of Health Care

The unique framework of this residency allowed for the artist-in-residence to reach out to local museums, scholars, artists and poets and benefit from support for focused time to create new work in correspondence with the socio-political and geographic context of Kingston and Queen’s University. The artists worked closely with Geophysicist, Dr. Alexander Braun and the Miller Museum of Geology on several projects. The Museum of Health Care made its collections available for research and the loan of rarely-exhibited wax childbirth models. Other faculty collaborators were Allison Goebel and Mark Epprecht. The artists initiated a key collaboration with seniors at the Kingston Senior’s Centre that resulted in a new video work. While the residency encouraged networking with peers and the research environment of Queen’s and Kingston, it also allowed them to develop a new project in our galleries using a theatre performer to question gallery-disciplined behaviours, a project later exhibited at SFU’s Audain Galleries. The partnership with the Film and Media Program at Queen’s University gave the artists’ access to the state of the art film production equipment, expertise and venues at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts for the creation of new content for their exhibition at the Agnes, The Golden USB. This partnership extended both the production value and reach of their work, facilitating work with students, especially through classes run by Emily Pelstring and Gary Kibbins.

FORUM: The Golden USB Committee Dialogues. Photo: Tim Forbes

FORUM: The Golden USB Committee Dialogues. Photo: Tim Forbes

Lorna Brown in Conversation with Richard Ibghy & Marilou Lemmens

Lorna Brown in Conversation with Richard Ibghy & Marilou Lemmens

An open workshop with Ibghy and Lemmens as part of the Your Own Grad School program for local artists in collaboration with Modern Fuel Artist-Run Centre.

An open workshop with Richard Ibghy & Marilou Lemmens as part of the Your Own Grad School program for local artists in collaboration with Modern Fuel Artist-Run Centre.

ELABORATION: 4–15 September; 16–20 October 2017

There were many public events centred around the artists’ residency that engaged the participation of other local artists, curators, critical thinkers, the academic community at Queen’s and wider publics. Over the course of the residency, the artists continued to elaborate on The Golden USB’s themes through a series of academic and open public engagements including an artist talk with the BFA (Visual Art) Program at Queen’s, a co-presentation with SPEAKS: Cultural Studies Speakers’ Series which brought Vancouver-based artist, writer and curator, Lorna Brown to the Agnes for a wide-ranging conversation with Ibghy and Lemmens on their practice and an open workshop as part of the Your Own Grad School program for local artists in collaboration with Modern Fuel Artist-Run Centre. The residency came full circle with a public forum wherein the artists and select committee advisors enlarged on their research discussions that generated new work and critical interests within The Golden USB. The forum included local poet, Sadiqa de Meijer, Art Historian, Allison Morehead, artist and long-time collaborator, Kevin Rodgers, Physics Technologist, Bernard Ziomkiewicz, Sociologist, Mary Louise Adams, and Museum of Health Care Curator, Maxime Chouinard and was moderated by Curator of Contemporary Art, Sunny Kerr. This event activated a greater understanding and appreciation of contemporary art across multiple research disciplines and made accessible the research component of the residency through its diverse platform.

Ali Dixon assisted with the installation of The Golden USB
Ali Dixon assisted with the installation of The Golden USB

The Stonecroft residency allows students unprecedented access to contemporary artists; in 2017 the Agnes was able to hire Film & Media student Ali Dixon as Stonecroft Student Assistant.

EXHIBITION: 26 August–3 December 2017

Through spoken-word audio, filmed performances and specimens, contents of the Trade Catalogue of Everything are revealed. Displayed as objects of appropriation and speculation, these are samples from a USB-ready “commercial” list addressed to extraterrestrial beings. With reference to NASA’s 1977 Voyager Golden Record, The Golden USB captures land, water, air, plants, animals, and fragments of nature, along with human culture, industry and invention.

Installation view, The Golden USB: Richard Ibghy and Marilou Lemmens, 2017

Installation view, The Golden USB: Richard Ibghy and Marilou Lemmens, 2017. Photo: Paul Litherland

Installation view of The Golden USB: Marilou Lemmens and Richard Ibghy. Photo: Paul Litherland

Installation view of The Golden USB: Marilou Lemmens and Richard Ibghy. Photo: Paul Litherland

Installation view of The Golden USB: Richard Ibghy & Marilou Lemmens. Photo: Paul Litherland

Installation view of The Golden USB: Richard Ibghy & Marilou Lemmens. Photo: Paul Litherland

BIOGRAPHY

Marilou Lemmens and Richard Ibghy

Marilou Lemmens and Richard Ibghy

Richard Ibghy and Marilou Lemmens have developed a collaborative practice that spans across multiple media, including video, performance and installation. Their work explores the material, affective and sensory dimensions of experience that cannot be fully translated into signs or systems. For several years, they have examined the rationale upon which economic actions are described and represented, and how the logic of economy has come to infiltrate the most intimate aspects of life.

Most recently, their work was presented in solo exhibitions at the Jane Lombard Gallery, New York (2017), Owens Art Gallery, Sackville, Canada (2017), Louise and Reuben Cohen Art Gallery, Moncton (2017) the International Studio & Curatorial Program, New York (2016), YYZ Artists’ Outlet, Toronto (2016), Esker Foundation Contemporary Art Gallery, Calgary (2016), Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Montreal (2016), VOX – Centre de l’image contemporaine, Montreal (2014), Trinity Square Video, Toronto (2014), Monte Vista Projects, Los Angeles (2012) and G Gallery, Toronto (2012).

They have participated in a number of group exhibitions including at venues such as the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Vancouver (2017), XIII Bienal de Cuenca, Cuenca Ecuador (2016), Blackwood Gallery, Mississauga (2016), Art Gallery of Guelph, Guelph (2016), Postmasters Gallery, New York (2016), 14th Istanbul Biennial (2015), La Biennale de Montréal (2014), Manif d’art 7: Quebec City Biennial (2014), Herbert Read Gallery, Canterbury (2014), La Filature, Scene Nationale and La Kunsthalle, Mulhouse (2013), Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Høvikodden, Norway (2013), Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow (2012) and 10th Sharjah Biennial (2011).

Their writings have been published in Le Merle, C-magazine, New Social Inquiry and Pyramid Power. They have published two artist’s books Tools that Measure the Intensity of Passionate Interests (2012) and Spaces of Observation (2012). Recently, they contributed a catalogue essay for the publication accompanying La Biennale de Montréal (2014). The artist duo lives and works in Montreal and Durham-Sud, Quebec.

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Sophia Zweifel, Isabel Bader Fellow in Textile Conservation and Research, January–April 2017

Sophia Zweifel (l) and Gennifer Majors (r) working on garments in the Agnes’s holdings. Photo: Tim Forbes

Lacy underwear, starched collars, a beaded bodice: these are just a few of the objects in the Queen’s University Collection of Canadian Dress that Sophia Zweifel and Gennifer Majors have been examining as the 2017 Isabel Bader Fellow and Graduate Intern in Textile Conservation and Research. In residence until the end of April at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre and Queen’s Master of Art Conservation Program, Zweifel and Majors have been delving into fashion items from Kingston’s past as part of Zweifel’s investigation into the underexplored history of textile cleaning and finishing. Under microscope and ultraviolet light, they have been scrutinizing stains, residues and fibre samples on objects to determine the techniques and products that housekeepers, domestic workers and launderers used, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, to make clothes look their best. As Zweifel explains, “Whether a fabric is made of plant-based fibres, such as cotton, or protein-based fibres, such as silk or wool, dictates how the fabric would have been cared for, cleaned, and finished.” This period coincides with the rise of Home Economics as a discipline and laundry as an industry. Zweifel is interested in situating “the practices of historical textile cleaning within a broader context of what it meant to be clean,” as well as in the implications that this history has for future approaches to textile conservation in museums and galleries.

Zweifel and Majors have lab space in the Master of Art Conservation Program, the only graduate program of its kind in Canada. Throughout the project, they have been sharing their expertise with conservation students through workshops and discussions, as well as consulting with other conservators and professionals in the field about their research. Every two weeks Zweifel provides updates on the progress of her and Majors’s work in a blog on the Agnes website: https://agnes.queensu.ca/research/projects/. On Thursday, 6 April, 7–8 pm at the Agnes, Zweifel and Majors will present a public talk, “The Textile Conservator Meets the 19th-Century Housekeeper.”

Photo: Tim Forbes

About Sophia Zweifel and Gennifer Majors:

Sophia Zweifel holds graduate degrees in both Art History and Art Conservation, respectively from University College London, UK, and Queen’s University, Kingston. She also brings to her role a wealth of conservation experience with various public and private institutions, including the Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI); Conservation of Sculpture, Monuments and Objects (CMSO); McCord Museum; Canadian Museum of History; and Canadian Centre for Architecture. She is co-chair and co-founder of the Advocacy Committee for the Canadian Association for Conservation.

Gennifer Majors has a Masters of Philosophy in Textile Conservation from the University of Glasgow UK. For the past year, she was the Conservation Fellow at The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, where she worked with the newly donated Bea Roberts collection of Chinese minority textiles. Majors has also interned in the Costume and Textile Conservation Department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

 

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Ciara Phillips, Artist-in-Residence, 6 September–8 October 2016

Artist Ciara Phillips presenting “Workshop” during the Season Launch Reception. Photo: Tim Forbes

The Agnes Etherington Art Centre, in partnership with the Cultural Studies and Fine Art (Visual Art) Programs, brought Glasgow-based Canadian artist Ciara Phillips to Queen’s University as a 2016 Visiting Artist-in-Residence. Phillips’ five-week residency at the Agnes extended the first major exhibition in Canada by this artist, who is internationally celebrated for her printmaking practice. The exhibition presented Phillips’ process-marked print semiotics: energetic blocks of colour, repeating motifs, slogans and, recently, black and white portraits of women engaged in focused work. Phillips’ Turner prize-nominated Workshop (2010-ongoing) transformed the Davies Foundation Gallery into an active space of investigation, social action, discussion and debate. This space, with worktables and screen-printing equipment, became a site for a suite of community and student engagement activities.

The residency complemented the exhibition Ciara Phillips: Comrade Objects retrospective on the mid-career artist’s work, and was likewise structured by a sense of return: Phillips’s revisiting Queen’s University, where she first studied art. For example, she co-produced work in situ with her former teacher, Canadian artist, artist-curator and artist-publisher Clive Robertson. Building further on this concern for spaces of learning, Workshop (2010-ongoing) was a magnet for visitors, including diverse groups that participated in collective creation in the gallery space. Associated programs, including Free Family Care and The Globe and Mail Feminist Reading Group extended the feminist goals of Phillips’s work as well as the broader theme of hospitality driving our contemporary art programs.

Photo: Tim Forbes

Visitors to the gallery were witness to artistic collaborations between Phillips and Art History Bader Post-Doctoral Fellow Jennifer Kennedy, several invited community members, students in Fine Arts, Cultural Studies, Art History and Film and Media. Highlights from the residency included tours and discussions for Kingston and student audiences led by Ciara Phillips and Curator of Contemporary Art Sunny Kerr. Other meaningful impacts of the residency included a reading/artmaking workshop co-presented with Modern Fuel Artist-Run Centre for participants from Your Own Grad School, a poster-making collaboration session with visiting Cree-Métis artist Cheryl L’Hirondelle, and a Grandmother’s Council organized through Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre and Dylan Robinson, the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Art.

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M. Elaine MacKay, Isabel Bader Fellow in Textile Conservation and Research, January–April 2015

Elaine MacKay with a piece from the Collection of Canadian Dress housed at the Agnes. Photo: Tim Forbes

Dress historian Elaine MacKay and textile conservator Emma Neale have been discovering the lives of nineteenth-century Kingston women through the fashions they wore. MacKay and Neale are in residence at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre and in Queen’s Art Conservation Program as the 2015 Isabel Bader Fellow and Intern in Textile Conservation and Research. A gown worn by Laura Roche at her coming out party; Eliza Gordon’s new dress as she embarked on a new chapter of her life wedded to Rev. D. M. Gordon; and an outfit owned by Mrs. W. R. P. Bridger, wife of a Royal Military College professor: these are the figures that have been populating MacKay’s in-depth research. “Clothing is fundamental to a woman’s self-image,” she says, and can be used to read biography. But MacKay is not just interested in the dress alone; she is investigating the whole ensemble, accessories and all, for a more complete understanding of the messages that clothing conveys at different stages in a woman’s life.

Emma Neale and Elaine MacKay examine a piece in the Collection of Canadian Dress housed at the Agnes. Photo: Tim Forbes

 

In her work, MacKay is ably assisted by Neale, who brings her high-level conservation training to bear in the meticulous reconstruction, repair and cleaning of the historical garments. At the final stage, the ensembles are brought back to life through professional mounting. This focused project not only raises the profile of the Queen’s University Collection of Canadian Dress housed at the Agnes, but also deepens understanding of Canada’s sartorial history and material culture.

The Isabel Bader Fellowship and Internship in Textile Conservation and Research are awarded to two successful applicants every two years and generously sponsored by Dr Isabel Bader.

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Judy Radul, Artist-in-Residence, 18 September–7 October 2015

Judy Radul

Internationally-acclaimed Canadian artist Judy Radul was a 2015 Queen’s University Visiting Artist-in-Residence. The residency, developed and hosted in partnership by the Agnes Etherington Art Centre and the Department of Film and Media, involved the creation of new work in the Agnes’s contemporary galleries and the Isabel’s Art and Media Lab, which hosted Radul’s This is Television (22 September–2 October 2015).

A range of critical academic and public engagements emerged from Radul’s residency, including class visits and tours, an open reading group with Modern Fuel Artist-Run Centre’s Your Own Grad School, as well as the dialogue led by the artist titled, “This is Television: Process and Technology,” with art critic and founder of MOMUS Sky Goodden, and the public discussion, “Breaking down, turning up,” featuring Radul and Queen’s Film and Media faculty member and media artist Gary Kibbins.

The Vancouver-based interdisciplinary artist has recently focused on video installation, with her practice spanning across sculpture, photography, performance, and mixed media installations. During her residency at the Agnes, Radul built a new gallery-wide choreographed live-camera installation for her exhibition, Closeup, the Breakdown (29 August–6 December 2015) in the Contemporary Feature Gallery. Using programmed cameras and thrift shop mirrors, Radul constructed a machine for seeing the gallery differently, posing urgent questions about the aesthetic valence of camera space and the space of the self. The exhibition also featured Radul’s The Brain Display (2010), acquired by the Agnes in 2013.

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Derek Sullivan, Artist-in-Residence, 5–15 August 2014

Derek Sullivan

In summer 2014, the Agnes Etherington Art Centre invited Toronto-based artist Derek Sullivan to respond to the gallery’s architectural site and space in a commissioned work, Problems That Arise from Continually Confusing Left & Right (2014). This conceptual in situ work, located above the gallery’s reception desk, is the artist’s first monumental wall drawing. Problems… comprises a 10-segment folding ruler rendered in coloured pencil directly onto the wall. While retaining Sullivan’s handmade aesthetic and conceptual rigour, the work signals a shift in approach through its large scale and considered attention to site. Future, alternate configurations of the drawing, which has entered the gallery’s collection, may be composed using a template and instructions provided by the artist. Sullivan produced the work during a 2-week visit to the Agnes and Queen’s University, through shared engagements with and collaborative assistance by Kingston-based artists Jane Derby, Erin Milliken, Sara Perosa, Joan Scaglione, Anna Soper and Aïda Sulcs.

Sullivan’s artistic practice was further developed for Queen’s and Kingston audiences through an artist talk, “Filling In,” moderated by Sharday Mosurinjohn and Kevin Rodgers. The talk was presented in conjunction with Sullivan’s exhibition, “Four Notable Booksellers,” at Modern Fuel Artist-Run Centre (7 March–18 April 2015).

The commission of Problems That Arise from Continually Confusing Left & Right was made possible by Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Grants program and the Donald Murray Shepherd Bequest, Queen’s University.

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Lynne Marsh, Artist-in-Residence, 1 October–15 November 2013

Internationally-acclaimed artist Lynne Marsh was in residence at the Agnes in the fall of 2013.

Internationally-acclaimed artist Lynne Marsh was in residence at the Agnes in the fall of 2013. This initiative aimed to support Marsh’s artistic practice by combining research and studio time with public conversations and debate. During her six-week tenure, Marsh engaged with Queen’s University research and creative communities through public talks, seminar presentations, colloquia, and classroom interventions—a constellation of stages and contexts to discuss contemporary practice. This residence was also an avenue for the Agnes to experiment with new approaches to exhibition-making and to jumpstart artistic collaborations.

Public engagement with the residency was developed around three conversations and an off-site screening:

Screening: The Screening Room, 120 Princess St (2nd floor)
The Philharmonie Project (Bruckner: Symphony No. 5, movements 1 & 4)
Wednesday, 6 November, 8 pm, 2014

This screening was part of the Unibrow: Art House Film Series, co-presented by Modern Fuel Artist-Run Centre and The Screening Room.

Lynne Marsh’s presence as Visiting Artist in Residence at Queen’s University was developed and produced by the Agnes Etherington Art Centre in partnership with the Cultural Studies Program. Other collaborators include the Fine Art Program (Visual Art), the Film and Media Department, the School of Music and the Department of Languages, Literatures & Cultures (German) at Queen’s University, and local, national and international partners: Modern Fuel Artist-Run Center; Corridor Cultures Collective, Kingston; “Programme ICI: Intervenants Culturels Internationeaux” at the Université du Québec à Montréal; and the School of Creative Arts, University of Hertfordshire, UK.

This initiative was generously funded by the Principal’s Development Fund through the Office of Research Services at Queen’s University.

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Patricia Ewer, Isabel Bader Fellow in Textile Conservation and Research, January–April 2013

Patricia Ewer, the Isabel Bader Research Fellow in Textile Conservation at the Agnes in 2013

Patricia Ewer, the Isabel Bader Research Fellow in Textile Conservation at the Agnes in 2013

As the Isabel Bader Research Fellow in Textile Conservation at Queen’s University, January through March 2013, Patricia Ewer is researching a new way of evaluating the condition of textiles in museums and galleries. Her project involves developing a risk management system that will bridge preventive conservation, treatment conservation and exhibition planning. In doing so, Ewer addresses possible misconceptions about textiles as being difficult to display and the downsizing of museum textile departments. As part of her residency, Ewer is working closely with the Queen’s University Collection of Canadian Dress at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre and sharing her professional and academic expertise with Master of Art Conservation students.

Patricia Ewer recently co-authored and edited (with Frances Lennard) the book Textile Conservation: Advances in Practice (2010). She has served as Senior Conservator for the Midwest Art Conservation Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and as Treatment Conservation Manager at Historic Royal Palaces, Surrey, England. In 2002–2003, she was a Mellon Fellow in the Conservation Laboratory of the Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University, Atlanta and in 2002, the Quinque Fellow in Conservation and Preservation, Burrell Collection, Glasgow, Scotland. A long-standing member of the American Institute for the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, Ewer studied at the University of Minnesota, and has held conservation internships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. She is also owner/conservator of Textile Objects Conservation LLC, in Mound, Minnesota.

The Isabel Bader Research Fellowship in Textile Conservation is a research opportunity that promotes investigation in textile conservation and costume history. Through the generous support of Dr Isabel Bader, the Fellowship links two of Queen’s University’s most unique resources: the Queen’s University Collection of Canadian Dress at the Art Centre, which comprises over 2000 articles of fashion from the early 1800s to the 1970s, and the Master of Art Conservation Program, which offers Canada’s only graduate degree in conservation theory and treatment.

 

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Caterina Florio, Isabel Bader Fellow in Textile Conservation and Research, January–April 2011

Alicia Boutilier, Emily Higginson and Caterina Florio

Alicia Boutilier, Emily Higginson and Caterina Florio

As the inaugural Isabel Bader Research Fellow in Textile Conservation at Queen’s University, Caterina Florio will research public perception of conservation treatment. Emily Higginson will assist as the Isabel Bader Postgraduate Intern in Textile Conservation. Florio’s project, “Textile Conservation and the Museum Public,” will focus on conservation practices as part of the museum experience: how costume treatments are received and interpreted in exhibitions and to what extent modern aesthetic expectations affect the level of conservation intervention. During her residency, Florio will work closely with the Queen’s University Collection of Canadian Dress at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre and share her professional and academic expertise with Master of Art Conservation students.

A graduate of the Faculty of Literature and Philosophy at the University of Florence and the Palazzo Spinelli Institute of Art and Conservation in Florence, Florio has held conservation internships in Poland, Italy and Malta. She brings a wealth of conservation experience to the Fellowship position, having worked for a number of museums, public archives and university collections in Canada and abroad – including the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto; Bata Shoe Museum, Toronto; Archives of Ontario, Toronto; San Jacopo in Campo Corbolini Museum, Florence; and the University of Florence.

The Isabel Bader Research Fellowship in Textile Conservation is a new research opportunity at Queen’s University, promoting investigation and research in the areas of textile conservation and costume history. Through the generous support of Dr. Isabel Bader, the Fellowship links two of the University’s most unique resources: the Queen’s University Collection of Canadian Dress at the Art Centre, which comprises over 2000 articles of fashion from the early 1800s to the 1970s, and the Master of Art Conservation Program, which offers Canada’s only graduate degree in conservation theory and treatment.

Related articles:
Alyssa Ashton, “Preserving History,” Queen’s Journal, 27 January 2012

Lindy Mechefske, “Dressing Up an Historic Collection,” Queen’s Gazette 85.2 (2011)

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