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Doomer, Lambert
A Billy Goat and a Ram A Billy Goat and a Ram
Around 1660 Around 1660

Monumental depictions of animals, often in rural settings, had been introduced into the Dutch art market by such artists as Paulus Potter (1625/26–1654) and Jan Baptist Weenix (1621–1659/61). Derived from the established tradition of monumental hunting scenes, like those created by the Flemish artist Frans Snyders (1579–1657), they adopted a more bucolic, domestic tone. Weenix was the source for this remarkable depiction by Doomer of a braying male goat and a ram. It compares to Weenix’s monumental A Ram Lying on the Ground in the Rijksmuseum, and sets a similarly unaffected tone. The animals’ thrusting, slightly belligerent poses seem to suggest the character of their species. Doomer depicted a ram in an equally dynamic and even more distinctive position in a large canvas in The Bader Collection, probably executed during the 1660s. For the braying goat in the present work, Doomer made use of a pen and ink study not in Vienna. The frequent appearance of these animals in the artist’s paintings and drawings attests to his special interest in them.

 
Doomer, Lambert
Amsterdam, Netherlands 1624–Amsterdam, Netherlands 1700 Amsterdam, Netherlands 1624–Amsterdam, Netherlands 1700
A Billy Goat and a Ram A Billy Goat and a Ram
Around 1660 Around 1660
Oil on canvas Oil on canvas
68.0 x 85.5 cm
Gift of Alfred and Isabel Bader, 2013 Gift of Alfred and Isabel Bader, 2013
56-003.12

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