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Dhaliwal, Sarindar
At Badminton
1998

At Badminton exemplifies Dhaliwal’s large-scale mixed-media works on paper in its juxtaposition and fragmentation of images and symbols, and entices us with sensual beauty inflected with longing and the complex intermingling of cultures. According to Gayle Johnstone of the Edward Day Gallery (which has represented Dhaliwal), the vibrant blues, greens, yellows, and reds, as well as an overlapping, billboard-like composition in At Badminton, are used to describe a rich mix of remembered images including the flowers, trees, and manicured gardens of post-colonial India. The title is drawn from the three, freeze-frames, each of which depicts a woman in traditional sari playing badminton, a sport popularized by British army officers in 19th century India. These fragmented elements record the disorienting effect of serial cultural dislocations, and constitute an unconventional and very personal approach to the traditional genre of history painting.The decorative iconography of the trellis-like band of linked pansies connects this painting with its predecessors in Dahiwal’s practice, including such major pieces as Triple Self-portrait with Persimmons and Pomegranates, 1988 and Peonies II, 1997.

 
Dhaliwal, Sarindar
Birbansian, Punjab, India 1953
At Badminton
1998
mixed media on paper
overall: 152.5 cm x 122 cm
Gift of the artist, 2005
48-033

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