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Milne, David Brown
Carnival Dress, Dominion Square, Montreal (Dominion Square II) Carnival Dress, Dominion Square, Montreal (Dominion Square II)
1924 1924

Although he was a contemporary of the Group of Seven, David Milne followed a very different artistic path. In 1913 he was one of only two Canadians whose work was included in the famous Armory Show in New York. His main influences at that time were European, the Fauves in particular, and American, specifically Maurice Prendergast. Milne concerned himself with the process of art-making rather than with any search for an essentially Canadian form or subject. While he may have praised the Group of Seven as nationalists, as artists he criticized their preoccupation with content over aesthetic concerns. Milne’s work is characterized by a severely reduced palette, patterning, and the interplay between form and empty space. He believed that in order to make his paintings most readily readable, they had to be reduced to the barest essentials. Wanting his work to evoke certain feelings at a glance, he often reworked the same paintings several times to achieve a desired effect. Carnival Dress, Dominion Square, Montreal is one of three paintings done by Milne of the same scene, the other two can be found in the collections of the Art Gallery of Windsor and the National Gallery of Canada.

 
Milne, David Brown
Burgoyne ON 1882-Bancroft ON 1953 Burgoyne ON 1882-Bancroft ON 1953
Carnival Dress, Dominion Square, Montreal (Dominion Square II) Carnival Dress, Dominion Square, Montreal (Dominion Square II)
1924 1924
Oil on canvas Oil on canvas
height / width: 45.70 x 55.90 cm; 17.99 x 22.01 in.
Purchase, George Taylor Richardson Memorial Fund and alumni contributions, 1964 Purchase, George Taylor Richardson Memorial Fund and alumni contributions, 1964
07-007

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