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Maker Once Known
Coiled Grass Wall Hanging Coiled Grass Wall Hanging
c. 1978 c. 1978

This wall hanging is made from coiled and sewn lime grass, a material that was traditionally used by the Inuit in Nunavik (particularly the east coast of Hudson’s Bay) to make baskets and other containers. Lime grass was used for many purposes in addition to basketry, including stuffing for mattresses or lining of boots. The grass was picked early in the year, just after the first snow receded so that it was soft and pliable. It was then stitched around more tightly coiled grass, then sewn together to form whatever shape was desired. In the more northern communities, such as Puvirnituuq, Akulivik, Ivujivik and Sugluk, the artists would produce smaller, more delicate work, while the more southern communities such as Inukjuak, Umiujaq, Kuujjuaraapik and Sanikiluaq, made larger, heavier baskets due to the more robust grass.

This wall hanging was perhaps made as a sample or as a piece meant for display of skill or design. Typically, the coiled grass was formed into baskets, so this work is an anomaly. It depicts a symmetrical, mirror image of two human figures and two dogs. In basketry, decoration was added using strips of black sealskin, or more rarely dyed strips of grass. Coiled grass objects were time consuming to make and required a high level of skill. While grass work was largely the sphere of women, often their husbands would make a handle for the tightly fitting lid.

Maker Once Known
c. 1978 c. 1978
Coiled Grass Wall Hanging Coiled Grass Wall Hanging
c. 1978 c. 1978
Lime grass picture with imbricated pattern Lime grass picture with imbricated pattern
24.6 x 72.4 x 2.5 cm
Gift of Guardian Capital Group Limited, 2020 Gift of Guardian Capital Group Limited, 2020
63-015.55

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