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Inuinnait Artist
Dance Cap Dance Cap
Mid 20th century Mid 20th century

Loon-billed dance caps, created with alternating vertical bands of brown (quirnik) and white (pukiq) caribou fur and topped with a yellow-billed loon beak, were taken out during public celebrations and free-style dancing, or apkua-miut. Worn by men or women and passed from dancer to dancer, performers would shake their heads to set the attached ermine or weasel skin spinning. Across the Arctic, loons were known for their strength and tenacity, dance and song. Today, there is renewed interest in loon-billed caps as young people and old are using the drum and song to re-connect to their language and history.

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Inuinnait Artist
Inuinnait Inuinnait
Dance Cap Dance Cap
Mid 20th century Mid 20th century
Sealskin, ermine, yellow billed loon and leather ties Sealskin, ermine, yellow billed loon and leather ties
44.0 cm
Gift of Mary Robertson, 1991 Gift of Mary Robertson, 1991
M91-009

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