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Unknown maker
Hina Doll Hina Doll
no date no date

Hina are a style of Japanese doll that originated within the Kyoto court culture for both young girls and old women alike. They are now only considered as a style of ornate doll dressed in luxurious and ornate clothing, and commonly seated with their hands resting in front of them. Hina typically rest on a hinadan (a red-carpeted, stepped platform), with the central figurines sitting on the top step (often the imperial family). It is common for families to give a newborn daughter a set of hina, whether they be freshly bought or passed down between the generations. The hinamatsuri (Doll Festival) is one of the five seasonal festivals in Japanese culture and is celebrated to give thanks for the health of young girls (and in recent times all of womanhood). The hina are only displayed for the few days leading up to and including the festival and are quickly packed away afterwards.

 
Unknown maker
Hina Doll Hina Doll
no date no date
plaster ? woven cloth, paper, hair, wool, paint, glass, etc. plaster ? woven cloth, paper, hair, wool, paint, glass, etc.
height / width: 21.00 x 23.00 cm; 8.27 x 9.06 in.
Gift of Mrs. D. H. Marshall Gift of Mrs. D. H. Marshall
M77-121

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