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Gibson, Charles Frederick
Kingston, Upper Canada, Taken from the Royal Artillery Mess Room Kingston, Upper Canada, Taken from the Royal Artillery Mess Room
1832 1832

Charles Frederick Gibson (1808-1868) began his military career in 1825 with a commission as ensign in the 66th Berkshire Regiment of Foot. In 1827, he sailed to North America and, for the next six years, was variously stationed in Upper and Lower Canada (today Ontario and Quebec). After serving in Ireland, Gibraltar and Malta, he returned to Canada with his new bride, Barbara Fraser, to assume the position of secretary to Major General Jeremiah Dickson in Halifax from 1841 to 1845, where he became captain. Back in England, he eventually retired as brevet major in 1854.

Gibson produced numerous drawings and paintings while based in the UK, Mediterranean and Canada, including Kingston between 1831 and 1833. His artistic activity, however, is lesser known than that of other military colleagues, such as James Pattison Cockburn (1779-1847) and Edward Charles Frome (1802-1890), both of whom were also roaming the streets of the garrison town at the same time. Carefully rendered in pencil, ink and watercolour, his scenes offer a fresh perspective on Kingston’s changing townscape and military presence.

 
Gibson, Charles Frederick
Alton, Hampshire, England 1808-Alton, Hampshire, England, 1868 Alton, Hampshire, England 1808-Alton, Hampshire, England, 1868
Kingston, Upper Canada, Taken from the Royal Artillery Mess Room Kingston, Upper Canada, Taken from the Royal Artillery Mess Room
1832 1832
Pencil, pen and ink and watercolour on paper Pencil, pen and ink and watercolour on paper
30.5 x 45.5 cm
Purchase, Donald Murray Shepherd Bequest Fund, 2017 Purchase, Donald Murray Shepherd Bequest Fund, 2017
60-012

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