00:00
/
00:00
Macdonald, Jock
Primordial Fire Primordial Fire
1957 1957

Jock Macdonald’s artistic career in Canada, which spanned from 1926 until his death in 1960, saw various transformations in style. Starting off as a colleague of Frederick Varley at the Vancouver School of Decorative and Applied Arts, his early landscapes were very much influenced by the Group of Seven aesthetic. In struggling to find a form of artistic expression which reflected his spiritual interests, Macdonald starting experimenting with abstraction as early as the late 1930’s. He was influenced by the principles of surrealism and automatism as well as by a trip to Europe in 1954-55, where he met French artist Jean Dubuffet. In 1957, William Ronald introduced him to Lucite 44, a free flowing and quick drying material that allowed Macdonald to work with oil much as he had with watercolour. It was the work produced using this material that best represent the artist’s artistic vision. Jock Macdonald, along with the other members of the Painters Eleven, struggled for the acceptance of abstraction in Toronto and his influence, both as an artist and a teacher, was felt widely.

 
Macdonald, Jock
Thurso, Scotland 1897-Toronto ON 1960 Thurso, Scotland 1897-Toronto ON 1960
Primordial Fire Primordial Fire
1957 1957
Oil on pressed board Oil on pressed board
height / width: 137.20 x 121.90 cm; 54.02 x 47.99 in.
Gift of Ayala and Samuel Zacks, 1962 Gift of Ayala and Samuel Zacks, 1962
05-054

Subscribe to our “This Week at Agnes” e-newsletter to stay abreast of events, news and opportunities at the art museum.