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Unknown Maker
Shawl
1860s

This shawl was worn by Ann King Gray (b. 1794), and it was most likely manufactured in Paisley, Scotland, sometime during the mid-nineteenth century. Material evidence for this attribution includes the shawl’s black field, wherein the pink warp threads have been colour printed black to match woven design. This technique was invented by Paul Godefroy in 1844 and it was only ever used by British shawl manufacturers. What’s more, these areas on the shawl are haloed in black, which indicates that it is not of a fine quality. This fact narrows the attribution to Paisley, where Kashmiri-style shawls were produced for the mass market and not necessarily to a high standard of quality. Paisley shawls are distinguished as well by their florid sensibility, which is exemplified in this example. Significantly, there is a likely correspondence between the vegetal forms in the shawl’s design and the Victorian fern craze.

 
Unknown Maker
Shawl
1860s
wool
154.4 x 317.5 cm
Gift of Blythe MacDonald (Science '99), 2013
C13-002.02

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