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Trautmann, Johann Georg
The Raising of Lazarus The Raising of Lazarus
1750 1750

In the 18th century, Rembrandt’s prints were widely disseminated and clearly served Trautmann as a direct source for his paintings. They likely also prompted him to try his hand at the print medium itself. In his etching of The Raising of Lazarus from around 1759, he adapted features from prints of the same theme by Rembrandt and also by Jan Lievens (1607–1674). From Rembrandt’s 1642 Raising of Lazarus: Small Plate he drew on the figure of Lazarus, reversing it from left to right and retaining the placement of onlookers on either side of Jesus. And from Lievens’s etching he took over the figure of Jesus standing above Lazarus’s tomb. In the present painting of this theme, Trautmann preserved several aspects of his etched composition, including the cave-like setting and the wall of the tomb that runs across the foreground. The same pathos characterizes both works, but the most obvious parallel between them is the nearly identical, but reversed, pose of Jesus. The compositions do differ in several respects: Lazarus and Jesus appear in separate pictorial registers in the etching, but in the painting Trautmann places them in the same register, following Rembrandt’s etchings and conjuring a greater sense of intimacy.

 
Trautmann, Johann Georg
Zweibrücken, Germany 1713-Frankfurt, Germany 1769 Zweibrücken, Germany 1713-Frankfurt, Germany 1769
The Raising of Lazarus The Raising of Lazarus
1750 1750
Oil on canvas Oil on canvas
height / width: 34.30 x 29.20 cm; 13.50 x 11.50 in.
Gift of Alfred and Isabel Bader, 1995 Gift of Alfred and Isabel Bader, 1995
38-037.02

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